Ad Love: The New York Times

This Sunday, The New York Times will debut its first-ever ad to run during the Academy Awards. The spot is already appearing on social media platforms.

The simple, black-and-white typographic ad lays out, line by line, a litany of conflicting statements, anchored by the three words, “the truth is” — “The truth is alternative facts are lies. The truth is the media is dishonest…” and so on. All the while, voiceovers of various people proclaiming their own notions of truth play out in the background.

The ad is being released as news outlets have become subject of the news themselves, facing intense scrutiny under the Trump administration, with the president calling out major news organizations. It also comes on the heels of reporters from The Times, CNN and Politico were not allowed to enter the office of the press secretary, Sean M. Spicer in a Press Gaggle earlier today.

Check it out:

Ad Love: Nike Equality

Recently, the chief executive of Nike joined a string of top executives in slamming Donald Trump’s immigration ban, and  called the policy a threat to values that are at the multinational sports retailer’s core. Mark Parker said that Nike believes in a world where everyone celebrates the power of diversity.

“Regardless of whether or how you worship, where you come from or who you love, everyone’s individual experience is what make us stronger as a whole,” he wrote.“This is a policy we don’t support.”

The company has followed up with a new 90-second spot that “encourages people to take the fairness and respect they see in sport and translate them off the field,” according to a release. The ad features LeBron James, Serena Williams, Kevin Durant, Megan Rapinoe, Dalilah Muhammad, Gabby Douglas, and Victor Cruz. Actor Michael B. Jordan appears briefly and provides the ad’s voiceover. The soundtrack is a new recording of Sam Cooke’s “A Change Is Gonna Come” from Alicia Keys, who can also be seen in the spot.

The initiative “is centered on using Nike’s voice and the power of sport to inspire people to take action in their communities, with Nike leading by example with its recently announced partnerships with world-class organizations [PeacePlayers International and Mentor: The National Mentoring Partnership] dedicated to advancing this work.”

Nike has also announced plans to donate $5 million in 2017 to “numerous organizations that advance equality in communities across the U.S., including Mentor and PeacePlayers.”

Just do it, Y’all…

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Ad Love – My Super Bowl Picks

It looks like the Big Game, Lady Gaga’s halftime show AND the ads made a huge political statement. I wish I could say I am happy for the Patriots but that would be an alternative fact.

My favorite spots unapologetically addressed inequality, self-love and discrimination. I lived for it. Here are my top picks:

Audi – #DriveProgress 

Budweiser – Born The Hard Way

NFL – Inside These Lines

Tiffany – Introducing Lady Gaga  

84 Lumber – The Journey 

Air BnB – We Accept

Lyft Pledges $1 Million to ACLU

Ride hailing provider Lyft has taken a strong stance against Trump’s new immigration actions and ban on Muslim refugees (which Rudy Giuliani admitted is exactly what it was intended to be on Fox News on Sunday morning). In an email sent to users, Lyft noted that it is “firmly against these actions, and will not be silent to issues that threat the value of the community.”

This is one of the strongest statements against Trump’s unconstitutional executive orders from a tech company to date, and Lyft is also putting action behind its words: The ride hailing company also announced it will be donating $1 million to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) over the next four years. The ACLU filed suit against Trump’s administration for the refugee ban, and succeeded in getting a temporary stay of the order from a federal judge on Saturday.

Many other Silicon Valley companies have expressed varying levels of opposition to the actions by Trump and his White House, including Google, Microsoft and Apple, but Lyft has done so with a public document (the messages from many others were shared via leaked internal employee emails) and with a clear articulation of why Trump’s actions are wrong on a moral level, not just as a potential hindrance to acquiring top level global talent, or as a threat to current employees who enjoy U.S. visa status.

Uber’s Travis Kalanick released an email to employees noting that the Lyft competitor would be working with drivers potentially affected to provide them legal assistance. He also said he’d raise the issue of the ban’s impact on “innocent people” during a meeting with Trump’s business advisory council on Friday, of which Kalanick is a member. Kalanick also acknowledged that many employees might disagree with his decision to join Trump’s administration in an advisory capacity, and said they enjoy the right to do so. Uber employees have taken to Twitter to do just that, and the company faces calls to boycott its service, and saw physical protests at its San Francisco HQ as a result of Kalanick’s involvement with Trump’s White House.

Here’s the entire letter sent by Lyft:

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Via Tech Crunch