Jet Blue Gives Away Flights to Do-Gooders

I love Jet Blue.

The month of November is the JetBlue For Good Month. To commemorate JetBlue’s continued commitment to giving back and doing good, the carrier is adding a new mystery destination to its network this November, dubbed, “Destination Good.” From October 16 through October 26, those who are keen on joining JetBlue for a volunteer experience can #CheckInForGoodOnline at https://jetbluecheckinforgood.com or at JetBlue’s pop-up kiosks in surprise locations in Los Angeles and New York City to enter for a chance to partake in the service trip.

This will be a 4-day service trip to Destination Good, scheduled to depart on Giving Tuesday, November 27, from New York’s JFK International Airport. To up the fun factor, contest winners will not know where they are headed until the morning of November 27. JetBlue will be picking up to 50 do-gooders to volunteer alongside some of JetBlue’s crewmembers and non-profit partners. Successful contest entrants will be notified by November 20, 2018. The chosen do-gooders can each bring a guest along.

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During their stay in Destination Good, all participants will engage in daily volunteer and service activities that emphasize on the three pillars of the JetBlue For Good platform: (i) youth and education; (ii) community, and (iii) the environment.

No purchase is necessary for one to enter the Destination Good contest. Keep in mind the contest is open only to legal residents of the 50 U.S. states and D.C. who are 18-years-old or older and have a valid passport.

Those who enter the contest are required to answer philanthropic-related questions and their answers will be judged to determine who the winners will be. Contest entrants have to fill out a short questionnaire about what ‘Good’ they have to declare. For starters, JetBlue is looking for passionate souls who enjoy philanthropy and volunteering – regardless if one is a newbie or experienced volunteer.

Volunteer and Pay Your Debt.

I won’t get into how vicious school loans can be. We all are aware of that. And if you aren’t, lucky you!

*rolls eyes*

The great news is now there may be a solution of sorts to help pay them down and make the world a better place.

Recently, a small nonprofit called SponsorChange.org received a community service award for finding a way to help college graduates battle student loan debt by volunteering.

Here’s how it works: Graduates with student loan debt sign up to volunteer at organizations that need manpower. The grads help their community by putting in hours toward that organization’s goals. Then donors who have also signed up at SponsorChange reimburse volunteers by paying down their student loans. So the donors help the nonprofit get free manpower rather than making a traditional donation. The volunteers get help with their student loans—and gain useful work experience along the way. sponsorchange_logotransparent

Raymar Hampshire, cofounder of SponsorChange.org, sees that work experience as a key to his organization’s power. Earning money toward loan payments is hugely helpful, especially for recent graduates who are underemployed. Many are also hungry for leadership opportunities, tangible work experience, and the chance to impress leaders in their community or industry.

Hampshire started SponsorChange in Pittsburgh in 2009. The organization is now based in Washington, D.C., with satellite offices in Pittsburgh and Chicago. Graduates who aren’t in those cities can sign up if they connect with a nonprofit organization in their area that has signed up with SponsorChange. Or, Hampshire says, some grads who already are volunteering with an organization in their area have invited that organization to join SponsorChange, so that they can turn a basic volunteer gig into one done for student loan assistance.

Hampshire is working on a program of “virtual volunteering” that he hopes to launch later this year—using digital technology to help graduates battle their crushing debt. Participants would contribute volunteer hours doing work that could be accomplished remotely—such as grant writing or web design—for a nonprofit in another city.