Jeff Bezos Sends Dreamers To College

Amazon CEO, Jeff Bezos and his wife, MacKenzie, donated $33 million to TheDream.US, a national scholarship fund for undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children and are protected from deportation under the DACA program.

The grant is the largest in the organization’s history. It will go to DACA-eligible graduating high school students around the country. Each student will get $33,000 in aid over four years to help pay tuition and fees. The students will be eligible to attend one of 76 colleges and universities in 15 states that partner with the scholarship fund. At present, nearly 3,000 undocumented students are enrolled today through TheDream.US.

Bezos is the richest person in the world. The Bloomberg Billionaires Index puts his wealth at $108 billion. “MacKenzie and I are honored to be able to help today’s Dreamers by funding these scholarships,” he said.

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In 2015, Mark Zuckerberg gave $5 million to TheDream.US to fund college scholarships.

Bezos’ donation is the latest step by the nation’s top CEOs to protect Dreamers. Donald Trump moved to rescind DACA in September, and it is set to end March 5.

More than 100 business leaders, including Bezos, signed a letter to Congress this week urging Congress to pass legislation preserving provisions of the program. Failure to act will cost businesses valuable employees and hurt the economy.

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Support Victims Via Hand In Hand Now.

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The one-hour Hand in Hand: A Benefit for Hurricane Relief telethon airs live from Los Angeles, New York and Nashville Tuesday night (Sept. 12) at 8 p.m ET with a 8 p.m PT rebroadcast on the West Coast via ABC, NBC, CBS, Fox, CMT and more. You can watch it here.

The televised fundraiser — which will also air on BET, Bravo, E!, HBO, iHeart Media, MTV, Oxygen, SiriusXM, Univision and Westwood One — will be raising money for those affected by both Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma. The telethon can also be streamed live online through AOL, Apple Music, Facebook, Twitter, Youtube, Beats 1 and Huffington Post.

Hand in Hand has already announced more than a hundred performers and celebrities set to make appearances throughout the show, including BeyonceJustin BieberTravis Scott, Leonardo DiCaprio and many, many more. Proceeds will benefit a wide array of charities such as the Rebuild Texas Fund, ASPCA, Save the Children and DirectRelief.

https://handinhand2017.com/

Ad Love: Fenty Beauty

Rihanna’s Fenty Beauty collection was launched online in over 150 countries at midnight EST this morning and will be sold in Sephora stores and online everywhere later in the day. The diverse collection includes more than 30 shades.

I don’t need to say anything else. I will just leave this here:

Google Celebrates the 44th Anniversary of Hip-Hop in THE Dopest Way

Hip hop turned 44 today and Google gave me beats…and life.

Today’s Google Doodle marks the 44th anniversary of the Bronx party credited as the birthplace of hip-hop. The artwork is swagged out with by Def Jam founding creative director Cey Adams, but the fun starts when you click through to the interactive turntable game: Pull from an animated record crate stocked with classic sample material by artists like the Isley Brothers and the Incredible Bongo Band, then match it up with a Google-created beat. Former Yo! MTV Raps host and hip-hop legend, Fab 5 Freddy narrates, prompting users to unlock achievements like “scratch a record.”

The complexity level is kid-friendly, but it’s more than enough fun for adults. Don’t miss the records’ info buttons, which will tell you the BPM and the most famous hip-hop songs to have used the sample. Google’s blog also has an interview with Adams, Fab, and the game design team—read that here and check out one of my faves below.

 

Michelle Obama Teams Up With Spotify

Michelle Obama continues to show her love and support for the development of the youth in our country by attending the recent, Beating The Odds Summit. Partnering up with executives from Spotify, including Troy Carter, VP of Creator Services, and Danielle Lee, VP of Partner Solutions, Mrs. Obama gave an important address to the students of Washington, D.C.’s Dunbar High School.

Topics such as overcoming obstacles and learned lessons were shared by the powerful individuals to their student counterparts. 35 high school students spent a day long trip with the former First Lady as she inspired the college-bound students to consider majors or careers in the tech industry. College transition workshops, a panel where Spotify execs discussed the important role music plays, as well as a performance by R&B artist Kevin Ross all happened. The students definitely won the day by having the former First Lady invest in their future.

I don’t know about you, but I miss Michelle.

MO

 

 

You Can Paint Like A Legend

You don’t have to be an art expert to be familiar with Norwegian Expressionist artist Edvard Munch’s masterpiece, “The Scream.” If you aren’t familiar, here’s a refresher:

The Scream by Edvard Munch, 1893

Munch is making news that turns the focus away from big-ticket sales and thrilling heists and back to the nuts-and-bolts of his artistic process. Munch Museet, the Oslo-based museum responsible for safeguarding the artist’s archive, has teamed up with Adobe, the mega-software company behind Photoshop, to bring Munch’s paint brushes back to life.


In an effort to promote one artist’s legacy—and, of course, to launch a saleable product—they retrieved seven of Munch’s brushes from the depths of climatized storage and transformed them into digital tools.


When Munch died in 1944 at the age of 80, he left around 1,150 paintings, 17,800 prints, 4,500 watercolors, 13 sculptures, a stash of drawings, and the contents of his Norwegian studio to the city of Oslo. This massive trove included several of Munch’s masterpieces, as well as the paints and brushes he used to make them.


While Munch’s canvases are regularly on view in museums around the world, his materials rarely see the light of day, due to their inherent fragility. Photo documentation of the tools isn’t readily available to the public, either. Up until now, the only visual evidence of Munch’s process online has existed in several grainy, black-and-white photos of his studio.


Starting last year, Adobe and the Munch Museum set out to give Photoshop and Sketch users a first-hand understanding of the artist’s process. Their approach was unorthodox and unprecedented: Transform Munch’s age-old brushes into digital mark-making tools. When taken up by Photoshop- and Sketch-savvy millennials, the brushes would have the ability to imitate the artist’s strokes.


The custom brushes have been licensed by Adobe and used by graphic designers, illustrators, and artists the world over. Wired reported that Webster made over $100,000 in 2013 alone selling his virtual brush packs.


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These custom brushes double as a marketing campaign for both Adobe and the Munch Museet. But they also connect a vital art-historical practice to contemporary artmaking in the digital age. the future of art.


This, my friends, is the future of art.