Jet Blue Gives Away Flights to Do-Gooders

I love Jet Blue.

The month of November is the JetBlue For Good Month. To commemorate JetBlue’s continued commitment to giving back and doing good, the carrier is adding a new mystery destination to its network this November, dubbed, “Destination Good.” From October 16 through October 26, those who are keen on joining JetBlue for a volunteer experience can #CheckInForGoodOnline at https://jetbluecheckinforgood.com or at JetBlue’s pop-up kiosks in surprise locations in Los Angeles and New York City to enter for a chance to partake in the service trip.

This will be a 4-day service trip to Destination Good, scheduled to depart on Giving Tuesday, November 27, from New York’s JFK International Airport. To up the fun factor, contest winners will not know where they are headed until the morning of November 27. JetBlue will be picking up to 50 do-gooders to volunteer alongside some of JetBlue’s crewmembers and non-profit partners. Successful contest entrants will be notified by November 20, 2018. The chosen do-gooders can each bring a guest along.

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During their stay in Destination Good, all participants will engage in daily volunteer and service activities that emphasize on the three pillars of the JetBlue For Good platform: (i) youth and education; (ii) community, and (iii) the environment.

No purchase is necessary for one to enter the Destination Good contest. Keep in mind the contest is open only to legal residents of the 50 U.S. states and D.C. who are 18-years-old or older and have a valid passport.

Those who enter the contest are required to answer philanthropic-related questions and their answers will be judged to determine who the winners will be. Contest entrants have to fill out a short questionnaire about what ‘Good’ they have to declare. For starters, JetBlue is looking for passionate souls who enjoy philanthropy and volunteering – regardless if one is a newbie or experienced volunteer.

October 11 – The Day of The Girl

Everyone get ready for the Day of the Girl.

Taking place on October 11, and with ads and content aimed at encouraging education, career-role models and mentoring, organizations hope to bring awareness to the many ways the world needs to uplift young women.

Mattel’s Barbie is introducing the Dream Gap Project, an initiative it hopes will raise awareness of ways girls are blocked from reaching their potential. The company cites research showing that by age 5, girls are less likely to view themselves and other girls as either smart or competent.

A launch video stars a handful of young girls talking about the many ways they inadvertently undermine daughters: They are twice as likely to Google “Is my son gifted?” than they are “Is my daughter gifted?” for example, and far less likely to give girls science-related toys.

The effort also includes a collaboration with New York University associate professor Andrei Cimpian for a two-year post-doctoral fellowship, focusing on the Dream Gap in girls between the ages of 5 and 7. And the brand, which generated plenty of buzz with the launch of its “Inspirational Women” collection earlier this year, including fencers, boxers, snowboarders and artists, says it plans to highlight at least 10 “empowering female” role models around the world each year.

Meanwhile, Unilever’s Dove is debuting The Girl Collective, “a sisterhood on a mission to raise the self-esteem of girls everywhere,” with a vow to reach an additional 20 million girls with messages “that can protect them from the outside voices that influence how they feel about their appearance.” Shonda Rhimes, the filmmaker who has been partnering with the brand on Real Beauty Production videos, hosted the kickoff event on Facebook Live.

Nonprofits are talking about Day of the Girl, too. Girls Inc., citing research that a third of girls between 7 and 10 say their appearance is the most important thing about them, is celebrating the day with the launch of “Pretty,” a book that urges girls to be pretty brave, pretty confident and pretty strong.

It’s also got a social component, using #theprettyconversation and #selfworthies, pointing out that 35% of girls worry about being tagged in photos that make them seem unattractive, and 65% agree that ads and media set unrealistic standards.

And Plan International is sponsoring girls’ takeovers around the world, including a #DayOfTheGirl emoji for Twitter. Its U.K. division is using the occasion to launch a new video campaign aimed at preventing street harassment.

Twitch, Ad Council and Others Partner to Bring Suicide Awareness Livestreams

The Ad Council is partnering with game streaming platform Twitch to offer livestreams in support of the Seize the Awkward campaign, which encourages young people to speak out about mental health.

The Seize the Awkward campaign encourages teens and young adults to have difficult conversations about mental health by prompting them to reach out to friends or peers who may be at risk for suicide.

From Sept. 18 to 20, Twitch streamers Achievement Hunter, MissKyliee, Natalie “ZombiUnicorn” Casanova,” negaoryx, OMGitsfirefoxx, schviftyFive, and others will hold charity fundraising streams on their Twitch channels and will encourage donations for the Seize the Awkward campaign.

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Square Enix will also host a livestream of “Life is Strange: Before the Storm” featuring voice actors Rhianna DeVries (Chloe), Kylie Brown (Rachel), and Katy Benz (Steph) from the game on the stream. The episodic game deals with adolescent friendships, mental health, and social issues, making it an ideal title to stream for the conversations taking place around the campaign.

September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month, and as the common start of the back to school season it is notably “characterized by transition as young adults return to school or depart for college for the first time, making the Seize the Awkward message of checking in with a friend especially timely and relevant,” according to the press release.

Lisa Sherman, president and CEO of the Ad Council commented on the Twitch partnership as well as the other Seize the Awkward campaign movements with other digital partners like Reddit, Shine, and Tumblr.

“This extraordinary group of leading digital, social and experiential partners will give us the opportunity to reach teens and young adults where they are at a time when they may need to hear this critical message most,” said Sherman. “Each of our September activations offers a unique opportunity to authentically connect with young adults and provide the necessary resources to start important and potentially life-saving conversations.”

 

Uber’s Brand Refresh

Uber has spent the past year trying to convince customers that it has put its problematic reputation in the past. And what better way to usher in a new era than with a complete rebrand?

Uber has unveiled an entirely new look that will eventually feature a fresh, custom-made typeface, new colors, a redesigned in-app look including animations and more.

The company says this rebrand reflects Uber’s transition from “San Francisco startup to a global company,” particularly one that’s become a “platform of mobility.”

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The company is doing away with the symbol that’s been featured on its app icon for the past two years. Through the aforementioned internal research, the team discovered that most consumers don’t actually associate the symbol with Uber, and that drivers would even turn around the decal that featured it to the other side, which read “Uber,” so passengers could have an easier time recognizing their cars.

Uber found its strength in three things: Its name, the U and the color black. So in creating a new logo, they leaned into those features.

That new logo is a simple wordmark that (naturally) reads “Uber,” with a capital U, in Uber Move, a typeface that was custom-designed for the brand. Previously they’d been using Clan Pro font, which, though they licensed it, they still had to share with other brands that did the same.

In terms of color, Uber is zeroing in on black and white in its new branding. However, there are several secondary colors, all of which take inspiration from transportation, and feature bold-but-soft hues of purple, green, red, yellow, orange and brown. A bright shade of blue is the “safety color,” inspired by the associations of blue with security in everyday life: The United Nations, for example, as well as the blue safety lights that are omnipresent on college campuses. This blue will feature more heavily in the app, as an accent color.

The hope is that this rebranding will make Uber’s presence is a bit clearer to riders, drivers and potential customers. Uber’s No.1 imperative in the redesign is “seeing Uber and knowing Uber,”

Facebook Group Admins Get Comment Pin Power

Here’s a small, but relevant update – Facebook is now letting group admins pin comments in discussion threads.

According to Social Media Today, the option will enable group admins to highlight the best comments, or new angles of interest, which could help spark further discussion around a specific element, and boost engagement and interaction.

It’s the latest in Facebook’s ongoing efforts to make groups a more critical element of The Social Network. That push comes as more social interactions are switching to private or enclosed forums, with messaging apps seeing the biggest shift.

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With engagement moving away from the main social feed, Facebook’s looking to capitalize on the fact that more than a billion of its users are engaged in groups, with a significant number of those in what Facebook calls ‘highly meaningful’ communities.

If Facebook can help maximize groups, that could help them ensure users stay engaged, despite the trend away from public sharing. That’s why Facebook’s rolled out a heap of new groups tools in the last 12 or so months, including groups for Pages and group analytics tools.

Adding the ability to pin specific comments may not seem like much, but as noted, it does provide another way for admins to guide the conversation, helping to prompt further comment on the most engaging elements without users needing to scroll through everything else. If a specific comment is sparking discussion, putting it front and center will only help to generate more of it, which could make it a valuable tool for group admins to consider.

Ad Love: Fenty Beauty

Rihanna’s Fenty Beauty collection was launched online in over 150 countries at midnight EST this morning and will be sold in Sephora stores and online everywhere later in the day. The diverse collection includes more than 30 shades.

I don’t need to say anything else. I will just leave this here:

You Can Paint Like A Legend

You don’t have to be an art expert to be familiar with Norwegian Expressionist artist Edvard Munch’s masterpiece, “The Scream.” If you aren’t familiar, here’s a refresher:

The Scream by Edvard Munch, 1893

Munch is making news that turns the focus away from big-ticket sales and thrilling heists and back to the nuts-and-bolts of his artistic process. Munch Museet, the Oslo-based museum responsible for safeguarding the artist’s archive, has teamed up with Adobe, the mega-software company behind Photoshop, to bring Munch’s paint brushes back to life.


In an effort to promote one artist’s legacy—and, of course, to launch a saleable product—they retrieved seven of Munch’s brushes from the depths of climatized storage and transformed them into digital tools.


When Munch died in 1944 at the age of 80, he left around 1,150 paintings, 17,800 prints, 4,500 watercolors, 13 sculptures, a stash of drawings, and the contents of his Norwegian studio to the city of Oslo. This massive trove included several of Munch’s masterpieces, as well as the paints and brushes he used to make them.


While Munch’s canvases are regularly on view in museums around the world, his materials rarely see the light of day, due to their inherent fragility. Photo documentation of the tools isn’t readily available to the public, either. Up until now, the only visual evidence of Munch’s process online has existed in several grainy, black-and-white photos of his studio.


Starting last year, Adobe and the Munch Museum set out to give Photoshop and Sketch users a first-hand understanding of the artist’s process. Their approach was unorthodox and unprecedented: Transform Munch’s age-old brushes into digital mark-making tools. When taken up by Photoshop- and Sketch-savvy millennials, the brushes would have the ability to imitate the artist’s strokes.


The custom brushes have been licensed by Adobe and used by graphic designers, illustrators, and artists the world over. Wired reported that Webster made over $100,000 in 2013 alone selling his virtual brush packs.


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These custom brushes double as a marketing campaign for both Adobe and the Munch Museet. But they also connect a vital art-historical practice to contemporary artmaking in the digital age. the future of art.


This, my friends, is the future of art.

IBM Watson is an Art Instructor…and I Love It

Almost three-quarters of Brazilians have never been inside a museum, according to a 2010 study from the Brazilian Institute of Economic Research. There are probably many reasons for this, but among them is the feeling that art can seem inaccessible unless you’ve studied it.

For the launch of IBM Watson in Brazil, Ogilvy Brazil created an interactive guide that lets people have conversations with work housed at the Pinacoteca de São Paulo Museum. “The Voice of Art” replaces pre-recorded audio guides with a Watson-powered program that gleans data from books, old newspapers, recent articles, biographies, interviews and the internet.

It took IBM six months to teach Watson how to make sense of all that content. Hosted on cloud platform IBM Bluemix, its AI capabilities were put to work answering spontaneous questions about art by renowned Brazilian creators like Cândido Portinari, Tarsila do Amaral and José Ferraz de Almeida Júnior.

Witness the magic below:

I recently got to experience this technology hands on. IBM is sponsoring “Art with Watson,” a special exhibit at the Cadillac House gallery, 330 Hudson Street, in New York City’s SOHO through 4.7.

The show includes portraits of pioneers of science, society, business and design — including Marie Curie, Nikola Tesla, Charles Darwin, Eleanor Roosevelt, Josephine Baker, Thomas J. Watson and Paul Rand — all created by modern artists with the help of IBM Watson technology. Watson provided the artists with unusual insights into each subject – from Nikola Tesla’s patents and journals, to Marie Curie’s correspondence with her children.

The exhibit also features a “cognitive photobooth” that puts Watson in the hands of individual attendees. Based on responses to a series of questions, Watson creates a personal portrait with the same APIs used to create the gallery portraits. Check mine out below and learn more about Art with Watson here.

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